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Selecting Key Messages

Lesson 8 from: Create and Design Memorable Presentations 

Andrea Pacini

Selecting Key Messages

Lesson 8 from: Create and Design Memorable Presentations 

Andrea Pacini

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Lesson Info

8. Selecting Key Messages

Lesson Info

Selecting Key Messages

Welcome to a new chapter. And what you did in the previous chapter is you've brainstormed to find your key messages with your audience at the center. Now, the second step of the presentation process creation. This is about using the art of storytelling to create and develop a clear structure for your presentation and also to communicate in a memorable way. Now. By now you should have all of the ideas or at least most of the ideas that you want to communicate during your presentation and also remember that we are following a method here, the presentation score method. We want to make sure that the presentation you are developing here as part of this course and all of your future presentations will be simple, clear, original related and enjoyable. Now, if you think about it, one criterion related is already covered, related means that it's their presentation, not yours. And so you need to make sure that what you say is useful and relevant to them and that's why the very first thing we di...

d was to analyze, understand the audience and that's why you've completed. If you remember your abc audience, Bernie needs context and thats related. So your message is related to that particular audience. Now let's speak another criteria, Let's choose simplicity, let's make sure that your message is also simple. Now, a very simple but effective way for you to quickly work out what your audience really needs to hear is to imagine that you just have 30 seconds, half a minute, 70 words. That's it, if you can say in that time, then you can say any longer. If not your message isn't clear enough. It isn't simple enough Why 70 words. But it's very simple because when you speak in public you want to speak a maximum 140 words per minute. If it's more than that you're going too fast, you're speaking too fast. So 140 words per minute. If you have half a minute, 70 words. So there's no magic behind it's just pure month now for example, steve jobs made and I'm using steve jobs quite a lot here in this course and I'm doing it on purpose because here we are mainly working on business presentations and I think it's fair to say that steve jobs was one of the best if not the best business presenter of all time. So that's why I'm using him as an example quite often here now he made a long presentation when he launched the iphone in 2000 and seven. But let's imagine that he just had 30 seconds if he only had half a minute, perhaps he would have said something like this Today. I'm proud to announce a revolution that as momentous as the mark in 1984 or the IPod in 2000 and one, we are launching the first truly smartphone and it's also a widescreen ipod with touch controls and a breakthrough internet communicator compared to every other smartphone, it's so easy to use this truly is a revolutionary mobile phone and we are calling it iphone today, Airport is reinventing the phone And that's how you make it simple, that's it, 70 words, maximum half a minute. Now your turn the exercise for you is to complete your 70 words, I've provided the template for that. It's called 70 words. So here is the thing, go back to all of the ideas that you came up with during the previous brainstorming session and ask yourself if there is one thing, just one thing your audience really need to remember and take away from your presentation, what is it and how can you summarize it in maximum 70 words. It can be less than that, It can't be more than that and if you get stuck, consider following this format. What? So what what next? What? So what we're next, which by the way is also a very effective way for you to conclude your presentations. What means, what do you want to tell them? What should they remember from your presentation? So what, Okay, why should they occur, why is it important and relevant to them? And then what next? Okay, now that they care, what do you want them to do with it? Remember you want your audience to do something to take action after your presentation? For example, going back to steve jobs, the what was well today we are announcing a revolution. So what? Well because we are talking about a new smartphone for you which is so easy to use And compared to every other smartphone, you can do so much with it. And then what next? Of course there would have been a cultural action for people to By desire and for journalists to write really positive articles about it. What? So what what next 70 words maximum? And here is the exercise for you. Select your key messages with maximum 70 words. Then in the next lessons it's going to be very interesting because I'm going to introduce some possible storylines for you to develop a clear structure for your presentation. As always do the exercise, be creative, have fun and then I'll see you in the next lessons.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Exercise #1: ABC - Understanding Your Audience
Exercise #2 - Define Your Objective
Exercise #3: ATR - Brainstorm To Find Your Key Messages
Exercise #3: Mind Map - Brainstorm To Find Your Key Messages
Exercise #3: Traffic Light - Brainstorm To Find Your Key Messages
Exercise #4: 70 Words
Exercise #5: Storylines - Develop Your Storyline
Exercise #6: Storyboard - Sketch and Design Your Visuals
Recommended Reading

Ratings and Reviews

julie haskett
 

I was just beginning to create a series of presentations when I noticed this course. Serendipity! I thought I knew what I was doing, but learned some great techniques. More importantly I learned what NOT to do. Now I have much more confidence in the process.

michal babula
 

A lot of useful information.

Sara
 

Exceptional course. Very well organized and taught. The course was engaging and practical, with clear actionable approaches, examples, and activities from beginning to end.

Student Work

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