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Logo Terminology

Lesson 10 from: Craft a Logo by Hand

Nicolas Fredrickson

Logo Terminology

Lesson 10 from: Craft a Logo by Hand

Nicolas Fredrickson

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Lesson Info

10. Logo Terminology

Lesson Info

Logo Terminology

the logo is often made up of a number of pieces. They're all important and can sometimes stand alone. But I would argue that the most crucial piece is the logo type. This part makes up the most important messaging is generally the name of the brand. In this case the brand name buck. It's the most important part in the descriptor knives explains what they offer, but it can remain secondary as it's slightly less important than the actual brand itself. This secondary text is sometimes called a tagline. Another important piece that can sometimes outshine the logo type is the logo mark. It's the icon that complements the brand. In my case, the anvil makes up the logo mark. Once the company is big enough, you may see the logo mark standing alone without any type. This is called succeeding with brand recognition. Oftentimes the simpler the better. For example, my two year old son, he might see the target logo mark on a bag out of context and we'll ask if we can go to target images speak quick...

er than words. So it can be beneficial to work on brand recognition by creating a logo mark. This is why colors are important too. They allow for brand recognition as well. The target is red walmart is blue. Home Depot is orange roses blue. You get the picture. There are reasons for these choices, but they all do a great job implementing colors. So as to push their brands even further. Walk into another piece. I did. Yeah, so here's the logo I did for a photography team. They focus on wedding photography. So I wanted to create something elegant. I went with a friendly blue color scheme paired with some script lettering, including long flourished here. Long flourishes are reminiscent of fine calligraphy on wedding invitations. In this case, I don't have a logo mark that pairs with the logo type, but have your purpose that I am here to stand alone as a logo mark, your choices of letter style can greatly affect your demographic. In this case, I chose to pair the script lettering with sans serif lettering in order to allow the word molars to shine the sand. Saref type works well with script to give a more modern feel, which is what I was going for. San. Serif type can take up the bulk of the logo. If a company is modern, big on simplicity, clean craftsmanship, cleanliness, etcetera. Or if you just want the logo mark to shine, think of target and how their logo mark is emphasized as the literal target, the place you want to be. The use the san serif typeface. Helvetica to really allow the target again to shine. Serif type can take up the bulk of the logo for a more traditional approach. You'll see a lot of universities using serif type as it has a vibe of sophistication added to it. Script. Lettering can vary in styles more classic looking. Calligraphy can be used for similar purposes as serif type, but a style with a slightly bolder lines than ordinary calligraphy. like this example here might be used for a company who doesn't want to seem dated, compare Saks Fifth Avenue with all of gardens updated logo. To see what a difference you can achieve with styles of script. You have to weigh your creative brief with these general rules. Even if you can break those rules, you can make a syrup look modern, for example, just as you can make sand saref look vintage.

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