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Concept Roughs

Lesson 17 from: Craft a Logo by Hand

Nicolas Fredrickson

Concept Roughs

Lesson 17 from: Craft a Logo by Hand

Nicolas Fredrickson

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Lesson Info

17. Concept Roughs

Lesson Info

Concept Roughs

So once you have your, once you have your chosen concept and you're gonna obviously need to include your your client in for this. But again, for the purposes of this class, I'm kind of acting as the as the client and the designers. So so I get the final say it's not always gonna be that easy. But um and a lot of times clients will actually choose the concepts that you feel are the least effective. So definitely be be careful with what you're showing to a client. Make sure you're using objective reasoning like I was for this and talking about the the balance and the overall structure and layout. Use those. Use that kind of reasoning to weed out concepts and only show clients concepts that are objectively effective. Yeah, sure. Yeah. Once you have your, have you have your sketch up or you're the concept sketch you wanna go with start a new layer again. You know, I can turn off at least I don't know anything on layer one, I can turn off layer too because those are the that's the original ...

batch. But there are three here. I'm actually just going to dim that down. Okay. And then make sure you click on layer florida true, Active on that one. Actually, here's a case where I will use this this selection tool. So click the selection tool and I'm actually just gonna drag it up here. So it's a little more out of the way. Yeah. Okay, mm hmm. When I'm creating these refined refs, one of the things I like to do first is pull up a grid. So there's not currently a grid feature in procreate. They're working on it now. But there there's this texture, this grid texture brush. So I like to just paint the entire art board with that. It's a little tedious. But it's all right. Be careful. You don't lift your pencil in the middle of doing this or if you do, then you'll start painting a new grid on top of it. Okay. And once that I have that grid, I can just change the capacity of that one down quite a bit. I don't need it to be to show up very much. Mhm. That's one of the things that I like about those moleskine sketchbooks is that they have an option that that comes with a grid already. So I don't have to go through this extra step when using a mole skin. Okay, so back to this. I'm gonna go back to my technical pencil. Yeah, great idea actually. Shut this off. Make that a little darker now today. And the grid. Okay. Start dreaming lines. We can make sure these are parallel and we're in the computer. But as long as I get the general idea, yeah, don't need to go quite as long over here. Mhm. You might refined rough second. Still start with the skeletons of the letters and mhm And then come back over them. I'm not sure what style of if I want to do. I mean, it's like that, make sure you leave enough space since these letters are going to have some weight to them. So that's what I was doing here. Just kind of keeping in mind that the letter is going to be a little bit thicker. Crafting here's what it is helpful to have the grid lines, make sure this pretty straight. And so like the Warriors wrestling Camp piece from earlier, I'm again combining script with a serif style for an even more historic approach. I can already see that I'm gonna have to move this over a little bit, which is why I like to and I just plan it out like this without refining any of the letters too soon. I see. So in this case I can great select this tool here and I'm just gonna just draw around the section that I want to move over and of course that's going to mess up some of this. But that's okay since it's not too refined, this will help with the balance. Sometimes when you have slanted lines of lettering, you need to kind of stagger the right edge for visual balance as opposed to mathematically lining everything up. Perhaps we can roll that. Of course we can. Sometimes it's a little easier to move things around in the computer once you have, once you've traced it all I'd like to get as close as possible in this stage. So I don't have to worry about that. Yeah. Dang mm hmm when you want to make this follow that line. We'll see and kind of fill this space here. Nice big loops. And sometimes you can allow your custom lettering to help with the balance. In this case here, the flourish helps fill that negative space. I want to make sure I have the same stress like as you can see as I do on this letter here, as I do on the letters down here. So try to keep that angle in mind. Again, we can set up guides in the computer but let's try to capture that during your sketches and rough. You may need to add a little more stress on these angles. It's definitely starting to take shape. Kind of like it looks wrapping following the path of the A. Sometimes I like to do this with my deeds. Again, another case where adding a flourish can help maintain good balance by filling awkward negative space. G drops down and connects there. It's worth a shot. Kind of like that. Yeah, I think I will need to put more of an angle on this and this is what the word logo. It's looking like. It's leaning back a little too far as you can see. Yeah, I wonder is it perhaps that the word crafting and hand are too much of an angle. See if I went all the way straight like that. No, it's not too bad. But maybe some of an angle is still nice. Obviously in this case my balance is now off and now the piece looks like it wants to fall over. So I need to move crafting to the left and hand to the right to make up for that. Mm hmm. Name. I think that's about right. Yeah. Mm hmm, mm hmm. Time. I mean I will try to try this out real quick. You can always duplicate the layer and um turn that off real quick in that way. If you miss anything up, you can simply go check out the other layer. So too many kind of like that. I think I might try it try it like that and I can always try it back as an angle later. But I'm gonna do like the more linear approach that I was talking about earlier with angled letters like this. It can be hard to align things on the right since it's more visual than mathematical, refine these letters a little bit and you can create another letter over top of this if you'd like. But you can always just build on what you currently have looks like the lines a little bit crooked. This little piece of the letter is called a terminal and these are fun to experiment with because it gives them more custom approach and starts to look distinct from classic calligraphy which can give a more updated look, one thing with script letters is mhm You can actually be really helpful to learn calligraphy in advance because you learn certain things about the letters like where the thick parts and thins technically should be. And for example, oftentimes when you're, when you're going up with a calligraphy brush, your generally putting less pressure on the pence, your line will result as being a bit thinner and when you're going down you're often putting heavier pressure so your line will be appear thicker and so in that case, mhm. All through along this line I would well this could be a little bit thicker. But yeah, if I were doing this with a calligraphy pen I would probably be putting light pressure here and then on this big thick down stroke I'd be putting a lot of pressure. So this would be thicker. So that's kinda worried how I determine what parts are gonna be thick and thin. However, another way to differentiate from classic calligraphy is by allowing your thin lines to have a bit more weight to them, more so than the tiny hairline strokes you see with classic calligraphy pens thick and then thin on the upstroke. I always make the up strokes thin and then I'm going at a straight angle. I'm following the grid. The yeah, I made earlier as opposed to this rough little sketched one I made because I can see the lines in fact weren't quite parallel. I'd like to make sure if I'm if I have any little quirks to the letters like these, these terminals here that I'm consistent about them. So Kind of see that I have a C1 here. S everyone on the sea and wouldn't make as much sense if I had like a very sharp sort of like the coca cola logo and then had a A rounded one there. So you just try to be consistent with that. It might become eligible and I might just have to cut the t shorter like that. Mm hmm. Something like that. But Oh yeah. But then of course, then that sort of starts to look like what are I? No anything. I feel like that's going to be the way to go. We'll see. Oh no. Doing what I said. Not to do following the poor lines I made earlier. Stick go down too far. There isn't an exact science of how far apart letters should be spaced. But especially in cases like this when I'm using script, I just like to make it look as fluid as possible, sort of effortless appearing. For example, It shouldn't like if I were doing a T and I it shouldn't look like something like like that. Yeah. You can obviously see the difference there. Mm hmm. I increase this space a little bit. You see that space here is a little wider. It's easy enough to tweak and an illustrator again, since I'm doing custom lettering. I like to make that obvious by trying things out like this that you may not achieve with a typeface. It might not work, but it's worth trying out again with the terminal. Okay. I wanted to use the crossbar from that other example down of the eye. Mm hmm. Make this a little shorter. Mhm. I'm starting to feel like these teardrop terminals are a little too playful as opposed to a vintage. So, I may actually go another direction. We'll see how that looks once we're an illustrator. Actually, this needs to be a lot taller. These letters here, I kind of got mixed up. They're actually following the X height here. Sure, actually, I just, my selection tool like that. Of course, they're a little bit too thick looking now the words a and by are meant to be toned down in the hierarchy. So choosing small sand saref lettering is an effective choice. Some subtle syrups to this Lord logo. Yeah. I always make sure that the Oh, let's go slightly higher then. Mm hmm. The cab height or the baseline here. I'm just saying. Just subtly helpful to arrest. It's a little too messy. Started racing away and like right down here. It's hard to see what I'm It's actually going for. Mm Kind of can get pretty messy with my sketches. Maybe a little bit too wide. So sometimes I like to just take little notes. Like if I make a note like this. I'll note try it shrinking that down. Just a tad and illustrator. I can't figure out if I want something like that. Something like that. It's just fine. one of the tricky things with forming a ligature out of two letter styles is you have to make sure they transition fluidly. And you see how the the G. There's a bit heavier weight than some of these smaller script letters. So I need to transition from this sort of thick style of the G. Back to the subtly more thinner D. It's not too dramatic in this case, but something to keep in mind. Yeah. Including on those terminals again, didn't work, you know, I need to widen that a little bit. It's getting a little tight there. Whichever. A or n. I decide on my mother going to use if I use this a then I'm gonna want to just copy and paste it for this A And same with it because I want to make sure it looks consistent. Now you don't want to do that in cases where you're um making a piece that is very handmade, looking like um perhaps you do it with the a rough brush script and he wanted to look like it was done in a calligraphic way. In those cases you want to make sure that the A's are subtly different. And again, I'd recommend looking at a typeface like Edwardian script to get a sense of how the script letters are generally built. I'm actually not going to end this little section with a terminal. Oh yeah. Get a little too tight to that. A So I'm just gonna kinda keep it nice and subtle there. Mm hmm a little bit higher with that crossbar. Mm hmm. Shooting. Just don't fit the words by here. Perfect flourish. Yeah. Yeah. That wouldn't quite work. I was gonna say if I mhm. Maybe it will. And that's a good eyes. Trying to connect. Take a look at you out of that. I don't know. That looks a little goofy. I think you just have to end here instead bring that over. Just a tad him at this. Sure, that's centered. And this article, You can only use one over the other. Make sure they're consistent. We get a little busy with this g kind of interacting with the Oh, isn't it? It might be an idea. I have to end up scrapping, but I'll be glad that I at least tried it that overall. I think that's mm hmm. Pretty good. For the purposes of a refined. Rough. Okay. It's good indicator to me where I want everything to be. Yeah, I think we we can work with that. If you're just getting started in hand lettering. One thing I recommend is actually to start a new layer again, dim that down and go over it with the the technical pen and actually, yeah, outline it. Especially, especially if you're as sketchy of a sketcher as me. Yes. You're gonna need a trace over this and it can be easy to get lost if you have a lot of different lines like I did. Oops. So we didn't Okay, so you can drag from your color picker, they're dragged into the shape and it fills it in. Mm hmm. So sometimes it can be helpful to just trace over something like this as opposed to a bit looser version. I've been doing this for long enough. But when I create something like this, I know I know how I wanted to look in the end. So I don't need to go through that additional step. And once you're done here, obviously you'd send this to the client and get approval from them. But since I'm acting as the client and designer again, I'm calling it good. And I'm going to send it to my computer. So go back to your gallery and then slide this over and click share. Mhm Jpeg will be just fine. Right, I'm gonna air drop this to my computer. There we go. Mhm. And I was like, my computer got it. So that wraps up our time and procreate

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